An open letter to Chris McDaniel: What you can learn from John McCain

By Miles Brown
Aug. 7, 2014

Chris McDaniel

Hey Chris, I hope you can tear yourself away from your binders full of ineligible voters/women to read this piece of totally sage and free advice I’m about to give you.

So, I hear you and your supporters have had quite the rough summer. I mean having allies commit suicide and other supporters embarrassingly hijack opposition conference calls with the press can definitely make for a bad time. I also hear you just officially challenged the election results from your June 25th primary loss a few days ago.

I hate to break it to you Chris, but besides kidnapping Thad Cochran and reenacting the 1998 classic movie face/off in real life, this is probably the worst possible way to react to a loss. I totally get it though. You actually beat Cochran before this runoff and were a shoe-in for the win the second time around. But then came Thad and his menacing army of untraditional black Republican primary voters.

The thing is Chris is that Thad went out and earned those votes. He found another way to win. You never adapted to that development and, consequently, you lost. What’s worse is that with every day that you challenge the results, the chances your political career bounces back become that much smaller.

Perhaps you need to  take a page out of John McCain’s book (yeah I know he campaigned against you but still, hear me out!). The 2000 election happened pretty long ago, so allow me jog your memory. McCain, with his straight talk express and populist, mavericky rhetoric came seemingly out of nowhere to win the New Hampshire primary, shocking the establishment-backed George W. Bush. The win made McCain into a serious opponent, and a win in the South Carolina primary would have all but ensured the nomination for McCain.

In the days leading up to the South Carolina primary, the mud began flowing in McCain’s direction. The highlights included J. Thomas Burch, the controversial veterans activist, accusing McCain of having “abandoned the veterans” on POW/MIA and Agent Orange issues. Then, an unidentified party began a semi-underground smear campaign against McCain, delivered by push polls, faxes, e-mails, flyers and audience plants. These claimed most famously that he had fathered a black child out of wedlock, that his wife, Cindy, was a drug addict, that he was a homosexual, and that he was a “Manchurian Candidate” traitor or mentally unstable from his North Vietnam POW days.

Bush and his team repeatedly denied involvement with the South Carolina smear campaigns. But, regardless of responsibility, McCain lost the South Carolina Primary to Bush by 11 points. But did he challenge what happened, running the risk that no Republican would win presidency that year? Nope. He gritted his teeth and endorsed Bush in what was one of the most hilariously awkward press conferences in American Political history.

This is not a diatribe preaching party loyalty or me telling you to give up on elected office altogether. What I hope you eventually realize is that when you “get got” so to speak, or politically outmaneuvered, you move on, stay gracious and plot your next move. There will be other elections. Just be the bigger candidate and allow yourself time to regroup. It (sort of) eventually worked for McCain.

Finally, whenever you have some free time, I would suggest renting the movie “Frozen” and when you get to the scene where this song starts playing, just take the song to heart, you know, really absorb the words.

Good Luck and Take Care Mr. McDaniel!

Sincerely, Miles Brown.

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 [Photo: Courtesy of Friends of Chris McDaniel]
Posted by on August 8, 2014. Filed under Elections,Recent News,Top News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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